The film you are looking for was shown in EYE in a past programme.
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Part of IDFA

IDFA - Fire Mouth & Dreaming Murakami

Fire Mouth

It’s a blisteringly hot day at the soccer stadium in the city of Salgueiro, in the heart of the Brazilian state of Pernambuco. The sun beats down mercilessly on the breezeless concrete stands. The home team Carcará, named for a Brazilian bird of prey, needs to win. It may be a big game for the players, but the weather seems to have put off the fans—just a scattering of supporters are braving the heat in the stands or on the sidelines.

Up in his broadcast booth, Didi "Fire Mouth" Souza is delivering his ever-impassioned commentary. All of this and more is shot in moody black and white, giving the film an almost abstract quality. There are only details of people and the surroundings, and at no point do we see anything of the game or the players themselves. The voice of the commentator forms the soundtrack, with its background of chanting supporters and radio noise.

Luciano Pérez Fernández, Brazil, 2017, Portuguese, 9'

Dreaming Murakami

Mette Holm has been translating the work of Japanese author Haruki Murakami into Danish for many years . This lovingly crafted glimpse into Holm’s life follows her on a trip to Japan while working on the translation of Kaze no uta o kike (Hear the Wind Sing) the world-famous author’s debut novel. The translator feels perfectly at home in Murakami’s fantasy world, in which animals can talk and multiple universes coexist. Conversations with fellow translators, sometimes about a single Japanese word, reveal just how deeply involved Holm is with her craft.

Like the author’s work, the Japanese language also reflects a reality that's unlike what we know in the West. "It's like they are thinking in a totally different way," explains Holm. And that's precisely what challenges her and makes translating this work so much more than a job—it's a way of life. As Mette struggles to find the perfect sentences capable of communicating what Murakami’s solitary, daydreaming characters are trying to tell us, the boundary between reality and fiction begins to blur.

Nitesh Anjaan, Denemarken, 2017, Danish/Japanese/Englisch, 58'

(IDFA)

general information

opening hours

Exhibition
Daily 10am - 7pm

ticketcounter
Sun to Thu 10am - 10pm*
Fri & Sat10am - 11pm*
*depending on the final screening

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admission prices

Exhibition - Locus: Apichatpong Weerasethakul - Cao Guimarães
 

regular€ 10,-
discount € 8,50
friends of EYE€ 7,50
museumcard & IAmsterdam citycardfree
children up to 11 yrs oldfree
children 12 to 18 yrs old€ 5,-
CJP€ 8,-
Cineville€ 8,-
combi ticket (exhibition & film)€ 16,50

 

Film

regular€10,-
discount€8,50
friends of EYE€7,50
children up to 11 yrs old€7,50
Cineville, NFC, KNF

free (surcharge may apply)

10 tickets pass€80,-

 

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reachability

EYE is right opposite Amsterdam Central station on the north side of the river IJ. EYE is reached easily with the free ferry which sails 24/7, we are also easily accessible by car.

more information

The film you are looking for was shown in EYE in a past programme.
Sorry we can’t help you out. But as a lover of classics, genre and arthouse film we invite you to have a look at what is on view now.
Program a-z